Riggin Gear – It Travels Well!

We are so blessed that we get to sail with you all each summer.  What is equally wonderful is how well-traveled (in addition to sailing on the Riggin) many of you are.  We love to hear about and see photos of the varied parts of the globe you’ve adventured – especially while you are wearing your Riggin gear!

Jane in Tibet
Jane Fahey – In Tibet.
GregShannon1
Greg Shannon  – Left and middle in Disney, right in Australian blue Mountains.
ClaudeArbour
Claude Arbour – In Portugal.

Annie
Many more happy travels to you and (and also returns to us on the Riggin)!

 

Maine Gourmet Food Cruises – Bread Baking

Fresh sourdough baguette straight from a wood fired oven?  Sure!  Off the coast of Maine on an historic sail boat?  Even better.

Gourmet cooking cruises, culinary travel, or Maine Food Cruises, no matter what you call them, they all have the same thing in common – local Maine food, grown sustainably, and served with care and attention on the deck of the Schooner J. & E. Riggin.  We serve what I call swanky comfort food all summer long, but our special Cooking with Annie trips have an additional element – a bit of education.

Kalamata Olive and Black Pepper Bread.  Yum.
Kalamata Olive and Black Pepper Bread. Yum.

We aren’t “in class” all day long, so if you have a spouse or friends that are just interested in eating well while you learn a few more tips and techniques to add to your culinary arsenal, this is perfectly planned.

That said, anyone who wants to spend all day in the galley with me, watching and learning, absolutely can.  From 6am to 7pm, I’m in the galley making breakfast, lunch and dinner, so there are plenty of chances to get your hands doughy or dirty, so to speak.

The first in the series of topics that we talk about during the trip is bread.

Breads – to knead or not to knead, sourdough or quick breads, baguette or stirata, the world of bread is big and the options are many.

Bread Tip:  Did you know that there are two ways to encourage the formation of gluten (what gives a loaf it’s loft and structure) in bread?  Kneading is one and more moisture is another.  So to achieve a similar result, you can either spend 5 to 10 minutes kneading your bread or you can add more liquid to your dough and let time do the work.

 

Annie
Gourmet cooking cruises?  Who doesn’t want to eat well on vacation?  July 6 to 9th is our next Maine Gourmet Food Cruise.

Tree to People Ratio

To travel somewhere and experience differences and then to relish in coming home is a delicious feeling.  Last week, I traveled for five days with friends to Portland, Oregon, where the weather was so temperate, I didn’t even need the coat I’d left in my car in Portland, Maine.  I’m told by locals that it’s not typical, but at the same time, many of our dinners were spent in open, airy spaces where whole walls were thrown open to allow the dry, warm air to seep in through the interior spaces.

And even with all that fresh West Coast air, I stepped out of the car after a LOOOONG day of return travel to Maine and breathed deeper than I had in days.  It’s so FUN to travel.  AND it’s so good to love home.

The trip was full of firsts.  It’s the first time I’ve left my family for such a long time and the first time to Portland.  I love to travel, but it’s been a long time since I’ve actually gone somewhere that didn’t involve visiting family.

As you might imagine, any trip outside of my own kitchen is food focused.  Outside of Maine and it’s ethnic food focused, as Maine has got to be the whitest state in the country and hence is somewhat bereft in the ethnic-food-of-any-sort department.

My friends are shoppers of the Olympic variety so our first day was spent wandering through shops in the Mississippi neighborhood exploring hand crafted clothing and design stores coexisting with a fabric store, home and garden design stores, all things paper and one antique car restoration shop who’s owner was kind enough to allow us to wander in to see his work.

A Plymouth wagon – all fixed up and waiting to be owned.

There is a certain rightness about all of these stores living side by side as they all have one thing in common – a respect and affinity for the art of the hand crafted.  It comes as no surprise that I fell in love with this area.  We made our way past the Rebuilding Center – a place which I’ve serendipitously recently researched only to find that it is a solo store (I was hoping for one in Maine) – to Porque No.  Our Mexican lunch, wrapped in hand made tortillas, was accompanied by my first, but hopefully not last, carrot, cucumber margarita.  It’s actually MUCH better tasting than it sounds.  Carrot, cucumber and honey juice combined with the already perfectly delicious Margarita drink they serve.

A window collage at the Rebuilding Center – Maine needs a store like this.  Oh, wait, we have them everywhere:  the local dump where hopefully more is dropped off than picked up.

Juice hanging out on the counter waiting to be slurped.

I bagged out of the second half of the planned shopping and Margarita drinking in favor of a massage, but not before purchasing a yard of fabric at Bolt to make napkins for the new kitchen, a sewing book by Amy Butler, In Stitches and a block of Himalayan salt from The Meadow.

Dolls at Bolt – reminding me so much of the Waldorf dolls I’ve made for the girls.

Annie
Back home – where the ratio of trees to people is higher

Email thisShare on FacebookTwitterDigg This!Save to del.icio.usStumble It!