Pan-seared Cauliflower with Kale Pesto

While initially I created this dish as a side to some sort of healthy protein, the more I snacked on it (while plating it up), the more I decided that this could be the highlight of a meal.  Served over polenta or quinoa and with a salad, I’d be a happy camper.  Only those major meat-lovers would be sad to not have their mainstay.  The rest of us, though?  Yum.

RoastedCauliflowerKalePesto2

RoastedCauliflowerKalePesto1

Pan-seared Cauliflower with Kale Pesto
Did you know that the green leaves on the bottom of the cauliflower heads are edible? Use them for kimchi, a small slaw, garnish or in a stir-fry. Think about them as you would cabbage.

1 head cauliflower
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
Several grinds of fresh black pepper
2 anchovies, minced
1/2 cup kale pesto
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Remove the green leaves from the cauliflower. Make slices 3/4-inch thick beginning at one end as you would bread. When you reach the core, turn the flat side down and repeat until you have cut all four sides. Discard the harder and more fibrous core.

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add the oil. Add the cauliflower, salt and pepper and cover with a lid. Check often to stir and reduce heat to medium if the pieces begin to darken too much. Break any large pieces with a wooden spoon. When the cauliflower begins to soften, about 10 minutes, add the anchovies and mix in well. Add the kale pesto, mix well and transfer to a bowl or platter. Sprinkle with the pine nuts and serve.

Serves 4 to 6

BabyKalePesto

Kale Pesto
This pesto is slightly milder than the perfumy basil variety, with a minor bitter note. It’s a star in our house and is used in soups, pastas, sandwiches and pizzas – all the ways you would consider for a traditional pesto. Also, if you have someone with a pinenut allergy, sunflower seeds are an excellent substitute.

8 ounces kale leaves, stems removed
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
Several grinds of fresh black pepper
2 ounces grated Parmesan cheese; about 1/2 cup
1/4 cup pine nuts
3 teaspoons minced garlic; about 3 cloves

Combine all ingredients in a food processer. Freeze what you won’t use within a few days.

Makes 2 cups

Annie
Lovin’ my veggies

Iolaire – We Bought a Tiny Schooner

We’d like to introduce you to the newest boat in our fleet.  Meet Iolaire (pronounced yawl’-a-rah), which means “eagle” in Gaelic. She is a Scottish sixern, a Shetland Island fishing boat.  The sixern is descended from the Norse seksæring, meaning six-oared boat – ancestor of the schooner.

Iolaire only has four oars and is a standing lug-rigged schooner.  Her masts are nearly equal in height and both are removable for easy storage.

Built in 1984 for Dr. Kenneth Leighton, author of Oar and Sail (Creekstone Press, 1999), she was also once owned by Maynard Bray’s grandson.  We found her in Vermont and she made her way to us this fall.

Our hope is that she’ll be a more stable small boat that we can launch once the big schooner is at anchor – for those who didn’t get enough sailing during the day.

Glen - Iolaire sm

Glen - Iolaire2 smIolaire sm

photo smAnnie
Isn’t she pretty?!

Breads – To Knead or Not to Knead

Spinach, Sun-dried Tomato & Artichoke No Knead Bread 5

I’m a fan of them all, kneaded and no-knead breads.  They are all my children and I love them, different though they be.  This week’s column is on ways to use sourdough starter in breads for flavor rather than as a leavener.  I know, I know, sourdough IS a leavener, but not for someone who has limited space and time, say someone who cooks out of a boat galley.  Therefore, because sourdough isn’t a fail proof method for me on the boat, I’ve developed my own ways of using it that don’t require so much tending.

There are also a number of other sourdough breads that I’ve posted in the past should you get super excited and find yourself on a bread roll….  Ha!

Annie
Still ‘Ha!’

Culinary Travel – It’s All About the Food Cruise

AnnietomWe created the It’s All About the Food trips to challenge ourselves to go completely local in our buying  AND because on the Riggin we love food. 

Come make creative comfort food with me, Captain and Chef Annie Mahle. I’m not only the chef on the J&E Riggin, but am the author of At Home At Sea: Recipes from the Maine Windjammer J&E Riggin, a cooking instructor and columnist for Maine’s largest newspaper the, Portland Press Herald, and for Maine’s only food magazine, Maine Food and Lifestyle. Our Maine windjammer and I have also been seen in the Boston Globe, Traditional Home, Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors and cooking with Al Roker on the Today Show.

Your culinary travel experience begins with my 25 years in the kitchen. Learning how to build flavor, improvise with ingredients you have available and utilize different herbs and flowers from your garden to make creative dishes. The menus will focus on fresh, organic, and garden-grown ingredients, 100% of which will be procured within a 100 mile radius including meats, cheese and butter.  Our produce comes mostly from Tom at Hope’s Edge Farm. The photo above is of Tom delivering fresh produce. All the menus will showcase my love and passion for seasonal and quality ingredients.

The dates are June 7 – 10, July 21 – 23 and September 15 – 20. Visit our schedule for pricing and booking.

Annie
Actually, E wrote this post because I can’t stand talking about myself in this way, but it would be fun if you came sailing with us!

© 2008 Baggywrinkle Publishing