Five-Spice Snickerdoodles

So, Snickerdoodles, huh?  Comforting, homey, simple and… swanky when made with five-spice powder instead of simple cinnamon.  These are the grown up version.  The have-with-Darjeeling-tea version.  They are a taste of home with a party dress on.  I don’t often make cookies on the boat because they are touchy to do in a wood stove with lots of turning and watching, but I could be talked into it for these pretty gems.

SnickerdoodlesFive-Spice Snickerdoodles
Dough:
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter
2 eggs
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt

To Roll:
1 tablespoon five-spice powder
2 tablespoons sugar

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Cream the sugar and butter; then add the eggs one at a time. Sift the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and salt and mix with the creamed mixture. It comes together nicely with a strong mixer, but if you are mixing with a wooden spoon, you may need to work it a little with your hands as the dough is fairly stiff. Mix the sugar and five-spice in a small bowl. Shape the dough into 1-inch balls and roll in the sugar and five-spice mixture to coat. Place on a baking sheet and bake for 10 to 15 minutes.  Remove from baking sheet to cooling rack and store in an air-tight container.

Make 2 to 3 dozen

Snickerdoodle Cookies – A Holiday Tradition

Snickerdoodle cookies are a cookie of my Midwestern childhood – both a simple cookie we made together in school and one to make during the holidays.  It’s also, I’m told by our Missourian guest/friend/historian that they are the official cookie of the state of Missouri.  Good choice, guys!

Snickerdoodle1a

Snickerdoodle Cookies

1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cups butter
2 eggs
2 3/4 cups flour
2 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons sugar

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Cream 1 1/2 cups sugar and butter. Add the eggs. Sift the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and salt and mix with the creamed mixture. You may need to work it a little with your hands. Shape into 1-inch balls and roll in your hands. Mix 2 tablespoons sugar and cinnamon. Roll balls in mixture to coat.  Place on a baking sheet and gently mash with the bottom of a glass.  Flute the edges with the tines of a fork if you wish.   Bake 10-15 minutes.

Happy working in the kitchen
Annie

Gifts from the Kitchen – Yummy Cookies or Granola

It’s only taken thirteen years, but I feel as if our household has finally gotten the hang of a simple Christmas, planning ahead, not taking on too much and really enjoying the days of baking and making gifts.  The girls helped me make a slew of cookie dough which we then wrapped in plastic wrap and then parchment paper, added a label and called them gifts.  The idea being that these sweet logs of butter and flour are frozen until such time that the recipients deem they need a sugar fix.  One, two or lots more slices later and freshly baked cookies emerge from their ovens – after the holidays when the baking blitz has died off.  Your favorite cookie recipes will most likely be forgiving enough to work well, as will one’s that I’ve posted before:  Annie’s Butter Cookies, Grandma’s Ginger Cookies, Chocolate Candy Cane Cookies, and the Cinnamon Pecan Oatmeal Cookies that are part of this week’s column along with Raisin, Molasses Granola and Cranberry Ginger Granola.

Annie
Happy baking!