Rosemary Chicken and Dumplings – The Perfect Comfort Food

I don’t know about your area, but it’s been DANG cold here.  Like this cold…

COLD.171608

When it’s this cold, what makes me happiest is pots of simmering goodness on the stove and steaming up windows.  Chicken and dumplings  fits the bill to a tee.

Also, if you’d like to see a demo, here’s me on 207 with Rob Caldwell.  (Next time I’ll get a hair cut!)

Rosemary Chicken And Dumplings
2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil
1 whole chicken, cut into 8 pieces (remove the skin if desired; I usually take the skin off the breast and thighs)
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon paprika
2 cups chopped onion; about 1 large onion
2 cups peeled and chopped carrots; about 2 large carrots
2 cups chopped celery; about 3 stalks of celery
1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic; about 3 cloves
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
2 tablespoons minced fresh thyme
3 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary
1 cup white wine
2 cups chicken stock

Dumplings:
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
3 teaspoons baking powder
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
3/4 cup milk

Heat the oil in a large, wide stockpot over medium-high heat.  Toss the chicken, flour, salt, pepper and paprika together until the chicken is coated.  Place the chicken in the heated pot and cook until browned on all sides.  Add the onions, carrots, celery, garlic, and herbs; cook for another 10 to 15 minutes until the onions are translucent.  Add the white wine and stock; bring it to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, until the meat is tender, about 1 hour.

Dumplings:
Cut the butter into the dry ingredients.  Make a well in the center and add the milk.  Mix just until the milk is incorporated.  Drop 1-inch balls of dough on top of the simmering chicken.  Cover and cook an additional 10 minutes. NO PEEKING!

Serves 4 to 6

Herbs Arrive in the Garden

Some silent but beautiful signs of spring and life in the garden…  Hello, old friends.

PerennialHorseradish
Horseradish – the leaves are sprouting and the roots are just peaking out of the soil.
PerennialLovage
Lovage – An old fashioned herb similar to celery in taste.
PerennialTarragon
Russian Tarragon – Not the lovely French culinary herb, but tall and wispy all the same.
PerennialChives
Chives – Add them to everything!

Make Your Own Boursin

In this weeks The Maine Ingredient I share a recipe for Boursin Mashers to accompany Delicata Squash with Thyme and Caramelized Onion, Mushroom and Turkey Meatloaf. Comfort food.

Boursin is actually a trademark for a type of cheese that originated in Gournay, France that has since been swallowed by the business of food.  The cheese is readily available in the deli section of the grocery store, but a close substitute can easily be made at home with cream cheese, herbs and garlic.

This is also nice as an easy hors d’oeuvres served with crackers, crostinis or crudités

12 ounces cream cheese, softened
1 clove garlic
1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley
1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh chives
1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire
Freshly ground black pepper

Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend well.  Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Makes 1 cup

Happy fall!
Annie

** Sugar & Salt: A Year at Home & at Sea is now available for purchase. ** 

Cook the Book: Sundried Tomato Spread

Sun-Dried Tomato Spread  

1 cup sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil (not the kind you have to reconstitute), drained
1/4  cup packed fresh Italian parsley
1/4  cup packed fresh basil
1/2 cup walnuts
1/2 cup grated fresh Romano cheese
1/2 head roasted garlic
Fresh pepper
Extra-virgin olive oil

Combine all of the ingredients except the olive oil in a food processor and pulse them until they are completely mixed. Turn on the processor and add the olive oil in a steady stream just until the mixture gets loose enough to roll and turn over (rather than being bound up). Refrigerate at least 1 hour before serving.  Overnight is even better.  Serve with Crostini (page 50).

Makes approximately 2 cups

Herbed Feta Cheese

Herbed Feta Cheese

This recipe is only practical if you grow your own herbs, otherwise it gets to be pretty costly.  But maybe you have a friend who would be willing to have you raid his or her herb garden for, say, a lovely wedge of herbed feta cheese?

This recipe also makes a wonderful summertime appetizer.  Instead of making the Tomato and Kalamata Olive Salad, use whole Kalamata olives and tomato and lemon slices to decorate a platter.  If you’ve got extra herbs use them too.  It’s a beautiful presentation with all the different colors.

 Marinade:

1 pound piece (or several large chunks) good quality feta cheese
8-10 fresh sage leaves
1 small handful fresh dill sprigs
5 sprigs fresh thyme
1 small bunch Greek oregano
4 sprigs of Italian parsley
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 lemon, thinly sliced
Extra-virgin olive oil as needed

To serve:
1 lemon, thinly sliced
Sprigs of herbs for garnish

Place the cheese, herbs, spices, and lemon slices in a Ziploc bag.  Add olive oil until the cheese is covered (you’ll use less oil if you squeeze out air as you add oil).  Seal the bag and refrigerate at least 6 hours (24 hours is even better).

To serve:

Remove the cheese from the bag, reserving the oil.  Cut the cheese into bite-size slices and arrange the slices on a platter with the sliced lemon.  Drizzle with the reserved oil and garnish with herbs.

Serve at room temperature with crackers or pita bread.

Serves 6-8