Thanksgiving Leftovers – Take Three

Potatoes are the one leftover which needs to be used up before it is relegated to the compost pile.  They don’t freeze well, so think of ways to incorporate this Thanksgiving leftover into another meal sooner rather than later.

Potato Leek Soup Photo Rocky Coast Photography
Of course, mashed potatoes can easily become a side for another meal.  And I’ve already mentioned that roasted potatoes could become Turkey Hash.  But there are a myriad of other ways that these versatile spuds can take root in another dish (see what I did there?).

Potato Cakes – Combine the mashed potatoes with some bread crumbs and an egg or two.  Dredge them in more bread crumbs or in grated Parmesan cheese and pan fry them in a little oil or butter.  Serve along-side grilled hanger or skirt steak or for breakfast with eggs and toast.

Potato Bread – Add mashed potatoes to your favorite bread recipe, reducing the liquid by half.  For example, if the recipe calls for 1 cup of water, add 1 cup of mashed potatoes and 1/2 cup of water.  Add dill, fennel or caraway seeds as an optional flavor.

Potato Leek Soup – Sauté onions and leeks in butter, salt and pepper. Add white wine and stock.  Stir in mashed potatoes and adjust for salt and pepper.

Potato Leek Soup Photo Rocky Coast PhotographyAnnie
My refrigerator is still full.  What about yours?

Thanksgiving Leftovers – Take Two

So many leftovers, so little space in the belly.  This is day two of Thanksgiving leftover ideas and turkey hash is one of my favorites.  Especially so when combined with greens – a much needed addition after a bit of fat and carb overload.

I’ve pared this hash with Brussels sprouts greens after discovering that they are just as delicious as any kale or broccoli leaves.  I’m lucky enough to still have some in the garden and will need to cull the rest shortly before it succumbs to a really sustained frost.

Turkey Hash Photo Rocky Coast Photography

Turkey Hash
Cut turkey and roasted potatoes into 1/2-inch pieces.  Sauté onions and celery in a large skillet and add the turkey, potatoes and any vegetables or squash that you like.  Add salt, pepper, Dijon mustard and maybe some horseradish to the pan.  Sauté until the ingredients are warmed through and are beginning to brown on the bottom.  Serve with poached eggs and roasted Brussels sprout leaves (or kale or broccoli leaves).

Turkey Hash Photo Rocky Coast PhotographyAnnie
Using up what we’ve got… and what we’ve got it pretty great.

Thanksgiving Leftovers

It’s a toss up as to which is the better meal – the Thanksgiving meal we had yesterday or the amazing leftovers we will have today and this weekend.  My mouth is watering over the endless possibilities, not the least of which is the turkey club sandwich that will be on my plate in the near future.  In truth, I considered having it for breakfast.

First things first, however.  If you haven’t already done so, add all of the bones from your turkey to a stock pot, cover with water, add an onion, a carrot or two, and a stalk of celery.  Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and let it hang out on the stove top for an hour or so.  Strain and either freeze or use for a quick leftover soup.

Make your own turkey stock

The next thing to do is freeze anything that you won’t use within the next couple of days.  Divide everything into individual or family-sized portions and place into re-sealable freezer bags or freezer containers.  Label and date everything.  (Even if you are SURE you will remember.  Three months from now, you won’t have a clue.)  Most items from a Thanksgiving meal will freeze well except anything that has potatoes in it.  Even mashed potatoes tend to become mealy and watery after being frozen so use those up quickly.

Next is to utilize all of those yummy leftovers and make something equally yummy for a meal today.  Here are a few thoughts and I’ll post a few more over the course of the weekend.

Leftover Turkey Soup
Less a recipe and more a suggestion, this is my favorite kind of cooking – open the refrigerator door and start pulling things out to make a meal.

In a medium or large stock pot, melt butter.  Sauté diced onions and celery until translucent.  Spices like cumin, curry, and chili powder take this soup far away from the traditional meal it began as.  Add cut up or pulled pieces of turkey, pureed squash or sweet potatoes, any steamed or sautéed vegetable and the turkey stock you just made with the leftover bones.  Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer.  Simmer for 30 minutes.  Serve with a salad and some leftover rolls heated up.  Add noodles, rice, gnocchi, diced potatoes, lentils or barley for variations.

Leftover Turkey Sandwich Ideas
The sky is the limit here, but you might try these combinations:

Turkey with mayonnaise, cranberry sauce, havarti cheese and lettuce on a baguette.

Turkey with avocado, mango salsa, cilantro and mayonnaise in a wrap (or wrap with lettuce).

If you were lucky enough to have ham too, layer turkey and ham with cranberry sauce, caramelized red onion and cheddar cheese on rye bread.

Roasted zucchini slices with creamed onions, Dijon mustard, tomato slices and a sprinkling of toasted pine nuts on focaccia bread with or without turkey.

Let me know what you made!

Throwback Thursday – Sea Water and Indigo


Sea water and indigo dyed Swan’s Island yarn hanging in the galley over the wood stove to dry.  Every hank was different and beautiful.  Thank you Mim Bird, Jackie Ottino Graf, and Swan’s Island Company for a great knitting cruise!

Season 2015 posted via @athomeatsea Instagram.  Photo credit Mim Bird

Riggin Gear – It Travels Well!

We are so blessed that we get to sail with you all each summer.  What is equally wonderful is how well-traveled (in addition to sailing on the Riggin) many of you are.  We love to hear about and see photos of the varied parts of the globe you’ve adventured – especially while you are wearing your Riggin gear!

Jane in Tibet
Jane Fahey – In Tibet.
Greg Shannon  – Left and middle in Disney, right in Australian blue Mountains.
Claude Arbour – In Portugal.

Many more happy travels to you and (and also returns to us on the Riggin)!


Multi-Grain Flaxseed Sandwich Bread

Okay, King Arthur, you got me good.  Your catalog just arrived in the mail today and I HAD to make your Golden Grains Bread.

Of course, anyone who knows me well is aware that actually following a recipe is next to impossible for me.  I can’t resist making a recipe my own.  Soooo, now I need to say, “thank you,” King Arthur, for the inspiration for this wonderful sandwich bread.

Multi Grain Flax Seed Sandwich Bread

Multi-Grain Flaxseed Sandwich Bread
3 cups all-purpose flour (of course I like King Arthur the best)
2 cups whole wheat flour
1/2 cup semolina flour
1/4 cup flax seeds
2 tablespoons poppy seeds
2 tablespoon vital wheat gluten
1 tablespoon instant yeast
1 tablespoon salt
2 1/2 cups warm water

Combine all dry ingredients together in a large bowl.  Add the water and mix until the dough forms a ball.  Knead by hand or with a dough hook until the ball is soft and smooth.  The dough will be just a tiny bit sticky, so add a little flour as needed.  Allow the dough to rise, covered, for 1 1/2 to 2 hours or until almost doubled.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Lightly grease two, 9″ x 5″ bread pans.  Form the dough into two equal loaves and transfer to the prepared pans.  Cover and let rise again for another hour or until the bread is at least 1-inch over the edge of the bread pan.

Make 3 diagonal slashes on the surface of the bread.  Transfer the pans to the oven and add steam in whatever way works for you.  (I have a pan of rocks on the bottom of my oven that acts as a sauna when I pour water in it.)  Bake for 40 to 45 minutes or until an internal read thermometer registers 190 degrees.  Transfer to a rack to cool completely before slicing.

Makes 2 loaves

Houses that smell like baking bread are also the best!

Homemade Backyard Apple Crisp from Super Scratch

Making Apple Crisp

Inspired by a guest who posted about making apple crisp from my first cookbook, now affectionately called “The Red Book,” it didn’t take long for me to decide to do the same. We do, however, need to back up a bit to start from super scratch.

Step one, plant the apple trees. Step two, wait five years. Step three, make apple crisp. That’s all. No worries, right? No one will think worse of you if you buy your apples at the store like most normal people.

Homemade From Scratch Apple Crisp

Apple Crisp
As it was cooling on the counter, Ella came into the house after school with the phrase of the day, “Okay!  What is it.  Where is it.  And can I have some.”

12 tart apples
1 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon lemon juice

2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons butter (2 1/4 sticks)
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Peel, core, and slice the apples into 1/4-inch wedges.  Toss them with the rest of the filling ingredients in a large bowl and transfer to an ungreased 9 x 13-inch pan. In the same bowl, combine the topping ingredients.  Cut the butter in with a pastry knife until the mixture is coarsely blended; mixture should be crumbly. Transfer the topping over the apple mixture and bake for 45 minutes or until lightly browned and the liquid in the apples is dark and bubbly.

Makes 12 servings

Houses that smell like baked apples and cinnamon are the best!


Blog on the move

We have been working out the kinks over the summer and are now proud to share with you the newly redesigned At Home & At Sea blog.

The way subscribers are transferred from the old program to the new doesn’t allow us to see if it worked. If you notice that you are no longer receiving emails of newly published posts just reenter your email address in the box to the right and you should be all set.

We look forward to posting more as we settle into life back on shore after a great 2015 season.